Independent
Activity #1:

Analysis of Moving Your Numbers Case Studies

Objectives

O.T.3.4

Teachers collaborate and communicate student progress with students, parents, and colleagues.

O.T.4.2

Teachers use information about students’ learning and performance to plan and deliver instruction that will close the achievement gap.

O.T.4.5

Teachers differentiate instruction to support the learning needs of all students, including students identified as gifted, students with disabilities, and at-risk students.

O.T.6.1

Teachers communicate clearly and effectively.

O.T.6.3

Teachers collaborate effectively with other teachers, administrators, and school and district staff.

CEC.I.7.1

Beginning special education professionals use the theory and elements of effective collaboration.

CEC.I.7.3

Beginning special education professionals use collaboration to promote the well-being of individuals with exceptionalities across a wide range of settings and collaborators.

Procedures

  1. Read five of the feature stories from the Moving Your Numbers website
    (movingyournumbers.org). Be sure to read each complete case study, not just the overview.
  2. Pay particular attention to how these districts use data teams.
  3. Develop a list of the teaming practices used in each of the districts.
  4. Then compare and contrast the teaming practices used across the five districts.
  5. Create a short presentation using at least two modes of representation (e.g., audio and a chart, PowerPoint with embedded video, VoiceThread presentation) showing how teaming practices in the five districts are similar and how they differ. (Note: The process of developing an instructional material that incorporates multiple modes of representation offers an illustration of and practice with using Universal Design for Learning—UDL—to develop learning materials for classroom instruction.)

Grading Rubric

Performance

Target

Acceptable

Unacceptable

Understanding of key concepts.

The analysis of five case studies reveals deep understanding of the practices that data teams use.

The analysis of five case studies shows deep understanding of at least three practices that data teams use.

The analysis of five case studies shows superficial understanding of the practices that data teams use.

Thoroughness in identifying practices.

The list of practices identifies at least 80% of the practices that are evident in five case studies.

The list of practices identifies at least 50% of the practices that are evident in five case studies.

The list of practices identifies at least 30% of the practices that are evident in five case studies.

Careful analysis of teaming practices across districts.

The comparison reveals insights about the features of teaming practices that are similar and those that are different.

The comparison reveals insights about the features of teaming practices that are different, but is less clear about similarities among teaming practices.

The comparison shows limited engagement with the task of comparing and contrasting teaming practices in the five districts.

Creation of presentation with at least two modes of representation.

The presentation includes two modes of presentation with content overlap of 90% or more.

The presentation includes two modes of presentation with content overlap of 70% or more.

The presentation includes just one mode of presentation.

Creation of a thorough and understandable presentation.

The presentation includes a clear introduction in which its objectives are made evident, an explanation accompanied by a demonstration, and an opportunity for user/audience reflection.

The presentation includes a clear introduction in which its objectives are made evident, an explanation accompanied by a demonstration.

The introduction includes an explanation accompanied by a demonstration.

Ohio's Data Team Process: Teacher-based Teams (TBTs) in Action

© 2015 School of Education and Health Sciences Grant Center, University of Dayton